Is Your Stack About to Get Smashed?

By Rui Maximo

What do the numbers 77, 102 and 20 mean? Nope, not lottery related, sorry. And no, we are not requiring any math today, you are welcome. Let me help you out:

  • 77 – is the percent of successful attacks that are fileless, meaning in-memory attacks
  • 102 – average number of days to patch a fix or upgrade
  • 20 – how long (in minutes!) for an attacker to exploit an unpatched system. 

Now that I have your attention, I’d like to share a learning opportunity. Polyverse was recently privileged to be a Terabyte sponsor at the SUSECON 2020 virtual event. As part of our sponsorship I delivered two sessions on how you can combat and prevent zero-day cyber attacks with Polyverse Polymorphing. Good news – these sessions are short, (your time is valuable!) each under 20 minutes long and both contain a live demo so you can see Polymorphing in action. 

The first session I delivered is titled, “Securing SUSE Linux Enterprise Against Zero-Day Cyber Attacks.” In this session you will learn:

  • There are over 1 million unpatched vulnerable servers today. Is yours one of them? Are you about to get smashed? 
  • How hackers mentality is “Break once, run everywhere” and what this means for you.
  • How to determine if your stack has in fact been smashed and what to do about it.
  • How you can use Polyverse Polymorphing to create unique versions of your Linux OS that are hacker-proof.

The second session is focused on the next logical step after protecting your OS; protecting your workloads and applications. 

This session is titled, “How to Secure Your Containerized and Kubernetes-based Workloads.” In this session you will learn:

  • How to manage cyber attacks when moving to a virtual machine, container, Kubernetes build environment.
  • How to detect and prevent run-time attacks within your build stack.
  • How Polyverse Polymorphing can help prevent attacks as you move up the stack to applications like WordPress and more.

My team and I are ready to help you stop zero-day attacks today. Feel free to reach out if you have any questions: rui@polyverse.com or @rui_maximo

Interested in learning more?

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